Meet The Man Behind Ohio’s Biggest Travel E-Magazine

This is the second in a series of interviews with people who operate blogs and websites that concern themselves with travel and especially tourist travel in the state of Ohio.  This weeks interview is with Frank R. Satullo who started the wonderful travel site, “Ohio Traveler Magazine” which has become very popular with folks looking for […]

This is the second in a series of interviews with people who operate blogs and websites that concern themselves with travel and especially tourist travel in the state of Ohio.  This weeks interview is with Frank R. Satullo who started the wonderful travel site, “Ohio Traveler Magazine” which has become very popular with folks looking for ideas for getaways around the Buckeye State.

Can you give me a brief description of how you came up with the idea for the Ohio Traveler.com?

I was working in the Cleveland area for a company that announced we’d be out of work within a year. In order to gain new skills, I taught myself to create a web site. With my PR background, I was able to get some media interest. The web site was all Cleveland related at the time.

One part of the site focused on free things to do in Northeast Ohio. It was receiving the most traffic so I expanded it to include anywhere in Ohio. When I finally became unemployed, I was fortunate to have a nice severance package and took several months to write a book about free Ohio fun. I used the site to provide updates to the book and they cross promoted each other.

Employment prospects were looking slim so after a while, I had an opportunity that forced me to move my family to Cincinnati. After 18 months on the new job, book sales were going well and the web site traffic was outstanding. So I decided to put the whole book on the web site, change its name and married my promotional background with my new love of Ohio tourism. That is when OhioTraveler.com was born. I have since expanded it to include any destinations in Ohio, not just the freebies. The site today focuses on the roads lesser traveled around the state featuring inexpensive or free things to see and do.

Like me, I assume you have some favorite destinations around Ohio.  What are your top three?

Easy. Cedar Point, Cleveland Metroparks system and Hocking Hills. Well, maybe not as easy at it used to be. These have been my top-3 most of my life but numbers 4 and 5 are not far behind. But you asked for the top-3 so I’ll keep you wondering about 4 and 5.

How would you describe Ohio to a visitor from another state?

You should move here! We have it all: A great Lake, A great river, Appalachian country, big cities, major league sports teams, forest, best amusement park in the world, Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, Football Hall of Fame, and one-of-a-kind festivals and special events galore.

What would you call Ohio’s best kept secret?

IT’S A TIE: National Museum of The United States Air Force in Dayton. No need to go to the Smithsonian! Plus, it’s totally free! And it includes three retired Air Force One airplanes and other original historic aircraft. The other best kept secret is The Wilds. I’ve been there in winter and summer and absolutely loved the entire experience both times. The conservation effort there is exceptional. Safari in Ohio. Who would have thunk?

If you’re still wondering about 4 and 5 from question #2, wonder no more.

Do you visit every place that you write about?

When I actually write about something for OhioTraveler, it is a place I visited. But I publish articles from freelance writers and press releases in OhioTraveler too. When I wrote my book, the answer is no, I hadn’t been to half of them.

Have you ever visited an attraction and been so disappointed that you refused to write about the place?

Fortunately, I have not had that experience. I guess with the Internet today, you pretty much know what awaits going in. If an attraction doesn’t offer as much as I had hoped, I turn the piece into more of a humorous experiential article and focus less about the place itself and more about the trip and the little things that happen along the way. If you pay attention, there’s no shortage of strange happenings or observations while on the road.
What destination that you have written about (Not necessarily your personal favorite) is the most popular with readers?

I am finding my readers like to feel they are riding shotgun with me no matter where I take them. So much has been written about most things out there, readers get a kick out of the personal accounts I litter into the story. More and more, you hear destinations marketing themselves as experiential tourism destinations. When I have the opportunity to write in an experiential style, readers respond to that more than anything else

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What do you look for when you first visit a new tourist area?

A rest room. I drink too much coffee on the road. After that, I look for authenticity and originality. I hate cookie-cutter and copy-cat stuff.

Why did you start out writing only about free things?

 Yes. The first travel writing I ever did was for a book I authored, titled, Free Ohio Fun. It featured free attractions, destination, festivals and events. Some places charged admission most of the time but on a certain day and timeframe each month they would open the doors for free, but often did not publicize this very much. When I was out of work looking for free things to do with my children, I was surprised at how many cool places existed. Triple-A told me Ohio has more free tourism attractions than any of the surrounding states and most of the country.

 My book had “FREE” stamped in large red text on the cover which posed a problem at bookstores when customers walked off with it thinking the book was free.

What tips would you pass along about finding interesting places to your readers?

 Even in today’s modern-age where information is abundant and instantly at your fingertips, it’s still a buyer-beware world. A few years ago, I took my family to meet an old friend and his family at a cabin. The online pics didn’t tell the whole story. We were in a cabinette on a culd-a-sac street in the woods with about 100 spring-breakers who had rented every cabin around us, except ours. Going back to question 6, this made for a very humorous experiential article. I never named or will name the place though. My mom taught me if you don’t have anything nice to say, don’t say anything at all.

  Is “OhioTraveler.com” aimed at a particular audience?

 I used to think it was most appealing to parents with dependent children but have found over the years it is used by many retirement communities, college students looking for cheap dates, and a growing demographic of grandparents traveling with grandchildren.

When you have free time where in Ohio do you and your family go?

 I grew up in the Cleveland area ( Lorain County) and still have a ton of family there so I love “going home” and to all the hot spots I grew up with such as the ballpark, Metroparks, Little Italy/Murray Hill, West Side Market, downtown, University Circle, out on the lake, a beach in Bay Village and Bearden’s Restaurant in Rocky River.

Tell me about yourself?

 I grew up in Avon Lake and saw it turn from a farm town to full fledged suburb. I spent every Sunday “down at the house” visiting my grandparents in Cleveland where 30 family members would be on any given Sunday. My dad’s family was really big. I grew up cheering for the Cleveland Indians in the 70’s when they couldn’t catch a cold. I once entered an editorial contest by The Plain Dealer in the 80’s about why I liked the Indians. I won. Maybe I was the only entrant. Anyway, the prize was dinner with the Indians and a game.

 The dinner turned out to be lunch at the kick-off of the winter press tour at the old stadium. I was a young kid but old enough where Mom just dropped me and my friend off at the stadium. We went to the restaurant inside and grabbed the most plush booth we saw. In came Gabe Paul (General Manager) and his entourage. A man ran ahead of them ran over to us and said we couldn’t sit there. I said we could because I won the contest. He looked puzzled and tried to shoo us away. By then, Gabe Paul asked what was the problem. The man said we wouldn’t leave. I said I won the contest. Gabe Paul said, “Boys, enjoy yourselves, we’ll find another place to sit.” So they crowded some tables and chairs together. We never ate with a player. We did eat while we watched the manager and one player take questions from reporters.

 How does this tell about myself? I always thought big, worked hard and stood my ground. But in the end, I just want to have fun. Oh, and I learned to check my ego at the door like Gabe Paul did that day. Say what you want about his running of the Indians back then but on that day, I respected the man. It is because of that day, I also became a skeptic and learned to question just about anything that’s sounds too good to be true.

                            -30-

Our thanks to Frank for taking time out of a busy schedule to sit down and talk with us.  Remember you can visit Frank by going to our links on the side of the page and click on Ohio Traveler Magazine.

Meet A Man Eating His Way Across Ohio. Festival by Festival

During the next several months along with our trips we will be doing some interviews with other bloggers and journalists who specialize in travel and tourism here in Ohio.  These are people you should know about if you plan to take the family on a One Tank Trip this summer.  They offer a wealth of […]

During the next several months along with our trips we will be doing some interviews with other bloggers and journalists who specialize in travel and tourism here in Ohio.  These are people you should know about if you plan to take the family on a One Tank Trip this summer.  They offer a wealth of ideas and can give you a peek at places and events you may have never dreamed existed here in the Buckeye State.

 We start this week with a Lorain, Ohio, blogger by the name of Kristian Campana who has made it his goal to visit every festival in Ohio.  His title has the unlikely name of www.300poundadventures.blogspot.com

       How did the blog, “Adventures of a trapped 300 pound man” begin?

 I had just returned from a wonderful trip in Ireland where I was driving all around the country and staying in various small towns.  When I got back, the travel bug never went away and I started checking out area festivals on weekends.  A festival here or there was typical for me, especially since there are so many in Lorain and Cuyahoga counties.  But I found myself venturing a little further out and going to them more frequently. 

 During all of this, I’m telling my friends about my experiences and they’re telling me to write it all down.  By the time I got to 14 festivals, I decided to start my blog.  But I wanted to write about more than only festivals, especially since I wasn’t sure how deep I wanted to go with it.  So I decided to incorporate all my adventures with food, including recipes, strange dishes I came across, and my methods to burn the calories off.

 I titled the blog “Adventures of a trapped 300 pound man” after something a friend said to me after I shared one of my food-related stories.  Apparently, to the belief of my friend, there must have been a 300 pound man inside of me trying to get out.

   When did it start?

 In 2009.
  How many festivals in Ohio have you attended?  How many counties are represented?

Since last year, I’ve been to 117 different Ohio festivals in 42 counties.  This year alone, I should have about 102 festivals or so by year end.

   What do you look for most in a festival?

Since there are so many different types of festivals, this can be a bit complex.  Overall, though, I would say that I look for unique qualities in each festival.  Sometimes this can refer to the actual theme of the festival, like the Skunk Festival or the Twins Day Festival.  For others, it may be how the festival’s theme item (ie pumpkin) is utilized as decor, gift ideas, food items, and even clothing. 

 I want that uniqueness to give some new awareness to the festival goer, whether through teaching or showing a new or different way to celebrate a theme/item/idea.

  What was your favorite festival?  Why?

 I would have to say Com Fest in Columbus.  It’s really unlike most of the other festivals I’ve attended.  It exists solely on the assistance of volunteers and local support and its objectives focus on eliminating prejudice and strengthening the community.  As a result, more than 70,000 people from varied lifestyles come together to celebrate the same thing.

 And since these people are so varied, the booths and entertainment that cater to them is also varied, meaning a great selection.

 There’s also a particular feeling at Com Fest that makes you feel welcome. I think that’s really special.
  What was the most disappointing event?  Why?

 In general, my disappointment comes from my own expectations.  For some festivals, I thought they could have done more with the theme.  Sometimes I got an idea from the website, only to find the festival to be something completely different.

 But if I did have to name a specific festival, I’d say the Potato Festival in Mantua.  I tried to get into the town from three different directions/roads and, each time, I was waved away by police.  The third time, I asked the officer what was going on and she responded that the city didn’t allow any entry during the parade.  Since the parade had just started, I decided to leave to another festival.
  For a family how expensive are the average festivals?  Do you have a limit on what you will spend?

For a family of 4, I would imagine around $25-30 for food and drink.  Many items are around $5 and bottle water is usually $1.  If each member wants a dessert, add another $5 per person.  Of course, this doesn’t include games, rides or souvenirs, so it can get costly if you don’t watch it.

 For myself, I don’t have a limit, but I’m usually very mindful of my spending.  If I really like a festival, I may buy a souvenir or two.  And more often than not, I’ll spend some money to try a strange new food that I come across.  But there are many festivals where I didn’t purchase anything.

   Your most memorable experience at a festival?

Participating in the Meatball Eating Contest at the Dean Martin Festival in Steubenville.  I had just come from a Greek festival down the road where I ate lunch, so I wasn’t even hungry.  But not many people were signing up and I thought, “Why not?”

 On that particular day, it was roasting hot and the competition was under the sun.  We couldn’t use our hands or drink water, so getting the meatballs down became really difficult.  I just kept chewing and chewing.

 I didn’t win it, but I was the only one to walk away with my bowl of meatballs and finish them off at my own pace.

   Where do you get your information about festivals?  How far ahead do you plan your trips?

I look everywhere.  DiscoverOhio.com is a great resource, as is ofea.org (Ohio Festivals and Events Association).  After that, I grab whatever travel brochures I can get from tourism offices and turnpike plazas, I get some great tips from friends, and I put Google alerts out there so I can stay current on new festivals.

  It has been said that Ohio has more festivals than any other state.  How do you feel about that statement?

Based on my own experiences, I would like to say that this is true.  We definitely have the perfect state for different types of festivals.  Our industry has brought waves of immigration, which has brought us cultural festivals.  Our agriculture has led to various festivals dealing with our crops.  And there are also many historical festivals that pay homage to events, trails, or ways of life.

 But it’s so difficult to get an accurate count of how many festivals Ohio actually has.  I still hear about festivals that are new to me, even after all of my research and resources.  Therefore, I can’t help but remain uncertain without having a better sense of number of festivals in other states.

  Who usually accompanies you to a festival?

My fiancé has accompanied me to nearly half of them.  My mom, uncle, and aunt have also come along to a few.  The rest of the festivals I’ve attended alone, especially during big festival weekends where I keep a stricter schedule.  This way, no one wants to kill me by the end of the day.

   What do you do in the winter months when there are not as many festivals?

Well, this winter I’ll probably get back to oil painting a bit and work on the website.  Otherwise, I still find activities out there in the community, even if they’re not necessarily festivals.  Maybe I’m just a restless spirit.

   Do you have some tips on how a family can get the most out of visiting a festival?

Do some research.  Almost all festival websites have a schedule.  Find what activities are most appealing to you and go around that time.  For bigger festivals, it wouldn’t hurt to print out a map and see what foods sound good so you’re not walking back and forth fifteen times before you figure what’s for lunch.  And share, especially if you go to an ethnic festival.  Get a bunch of little dishes and share with each other to get as much varied experience as possible.

  Tell me a bit about yourself.

 I was born and raised in Lorain, but have lived in New York City and Italy.  I do IT related work for the family business while also proofreading/translating for a school in Italy.

I went to the University of Findlay for my BA (English and Communications) and Bowling Green State University for my MFA (Creative Writing).

I speak Italian fluently, paint (oil), cook and travel.

I’m 36 (turning 37 this month) and I’m getting married next year to the girl I was with at the Romanian festival (good thing I didn’t take her to those big festival weekends!). :-)

Again, you can visit Kris’s blog at http://www. 300poundadventures.blogspot.com

 Remember festivals can sometimes be affected by the weather and it’s always a good idea to check the festival website to discover any last minute changes or additions to their program.  Also remember, check the dates, don’t be like the viewer who watched my report on Fox 8 about a rural festival that had run six months before.  They didn’t listen and drove several hours to get there only to find they were six months late and the only thing they found as they put it, “was a dog sleeping in the middle of the street.”

Roscoe Village Candle Lighting Warms the Night

It was a cold night, Saturday, December 4th, when Historic Roscoe Village in Coshocton, Ohio kicked off its holiday season with the first of three candle-lighting ceremonies in the center of the old canal town. I was privileged to be asked to be this year’s honorary candle-lighter. It was a beautiful ceremony that can’t help […]

It was a cold night, Saturday, December 4th, when Historic Roscoe Village in Coshocton, Ohio kicked off its holiday season with the first of three candle-lighting ceremonies in the center of the old canal town.

I was privileged to be asked to be this year’s honorary candle-lighter.

It was a beautiful ceremony that can’t help but put you in the holiday mood. 

It started with a book signing at the Welcome Center at Roscoe Village.  I got to meet several of the people who run this village filled with some living Ohio History.  It was also a chance to greet folks from all over Ohio as well as Pennsylvania and Indiana.

At 6PM we moved to a stage set up on the main street near a hillside where a huge Christmas Tree had been erected.  Following some Christmas Carols sung by a small choir I was introduced and lit the first candle.  I then turned and lighted the candles held by the choir members and then all of us moved to the edge of the stage and started lighting candles of people surrounding the stage.  the pinpoints of light started to spread down the street while the choir softly sang “Silent Night”.  In moments there were hundreds of candles glowing in the darkened street.  As I said it was a memorable vision on a cold December night.

Following the ceremony there were candle-lit tours of the village and venders had hot cider and other holiday goodies available to the crowd.  It was a great way to start the season.

For more information about candle lighting ceremonies at Roscoe Village check out their website at: http://www.roscoevillage.com

A Dickens of a Christmas in Ashtabula County

  Would you and your family like to share a holiday dinner with Ebenezer Scrooge?  You can do it this holiday season in Geneva-on-the-lake at the Christmas Carol Dinner Theater. A local thespian group, Noble Entertainment, with a cast of twelve, is presenting this unusual take on Dickens immortal “A Christmas Carol” at the historic […]

 

Would you and your family like to share a holiday dinner with Ebenezer Scrooge?  You can do it this holiday season in Geneva-on-the-lake at the Christmas Carol Dinner Theater.

A local thespian group, Noble Entertainment, with a cast of twelve, is presenting this unusual take on Dickens immortal “A Christmas Carol” at the historic Oak Room at 5479 Lake Road on the Geneva-on-the-lake strip.

It works this way:  Guests sit down for a six-course Christmas feast and find among the folks gathered in the restaurant  Ebenezer Scrooge who begins the story which then unfolds between dinner courses all around the diners.

It is an interactive play in which the diners also become part of the plot as well as participate in some of the festivities like dancing at the party given by Mr. Fezziwig, Scrooge’s boy-hood employer.  Or, playing games when the ghosts of Christmas take Scrooge to a party at his nephew Fred’s home……You can read the rest of the story and also learn about a train ride for the kids to the North Pole to ride with Santa back to Ashtabula County.  My story is in the Saturday, November 27 edition of the Cleveland Plain Dealer or you can read it online at www.Cleveland.com

41st Annual Holiday Candle Lighting kicks off Christmas Season

  We will be heading for Historic Roscoe Village in Coshocton to be the host of the 41st annual candle lighting ceremony that kicks off the holiday season in this popular tourist attraction.  The big show gets underway Saturday, December 4th  at 6PM outdoors in the center of the restored canal town. It works this […]

Candlelight ceremony in Roscoe Village in 2009

 

We will be heading for Historic Roscoe Village in Coshocton to be the host of the 41st annual candle lighting ceremony that kicks off the holiday season in this popular tourist attraction.  The big show gets underway Saturday, December 4th  at 6PM outdoors in the center of the restored canal town.

It works this way I will be on a stage and light a candle.  All the lights in downtown go off and the only illumination is my single candle which I then touch to candles being held by visitors surrounding the stage.  They in turn light the candles of others and in moments the light of that single candle becomes a wave of light that sweeps down the street and up the side of the surrounding hill.  It is a moving and imp;ressive sight and a wonderful family activitiy to begin your Christmas Season.

I will be arriving at Roscoe Village at 4 PM to go to the Welcome Center where I will be meeting visitors and signing copies of my new book, “Tales From The Road”

There will be a host of things to see and do at the candle lighting ceremony, including visits by Santa, local choirs and lots of good food.  I hope you will join us.  You can learn more about Roscoe Village at their website, www.roscoevillage.com

2010 Buckeye Book Fair A Big Success

The Fisher Auditorium at the Ohio State University Campus in Wooster became perhaps the busiest bookstore in Ohio, at least for one day. Saturday, November 6th was the 23rd annual Buckeye Book Fair, the largest book show in Ohio attracting more than 100 authors with Ohio roots. Hundreds of customers packed the auditorium in  a […]

The Fisher Auditorium at the Ohio State University Campus in Wooster became perhaps the busiest bookstore in Ohio, at least for one day.

Saturday, November 6th was the 23rd annual Buckeye Book Fair, the largest book show in Ohio attracting more than 100 authors with Ohio roots.

Hundreds of customers packed the auditorium in  a day-long chance to meet the authors and get autographed copies of their books.

Some of the featured authors this year included Regina Brett and her book,  ”God Never Blinks: 50 Lessons for Life’s Little Detours”,  Plain Dealer Sports Writer Terry Pluto and his new book, “Things I’ve learned from watching the Browns,” Fox 8 TV Sportscaster Dan Coughlin and his new book, “Crazy with the papers to prove it.” Maura Poston Zagrans and Dr. Issam Nemeh and their book, “Miracles every day” and myself with my new book, “Tales from the road.”

The show, which attracts book lovers from all over Ohio and nearby states is usually held the first Saturday in November each year.  You can read more about the show and the authors that were present at their website at http://www.Buckeyebookfair.com

Biggest Ohio Book Show

“Tales From The Road” book tour continues: I will be taking part in the 23rd Annual Buckeye Book Fair on Saturday, November 6, 2010, at the Fisher Auditorium on the Ohio State Campus in Wooster, Ohio. The show, one of the largest books shows in Ohio, will feature more than 100 writers and their books in […]

“Tales From The Road” book tour continues:

I will be taking part in the 23rd Annual Buckeye Book Fair on Saturday, November 6, 2010, at the Fisher Auditorium on the Ohio State Campus in Wooster, Ohio.

The show, one of the largest books shows in Ohio, will feature more than 100 writers and their books in a day-long show.

Among the many authors joining me will be my former colleague from Fox 8, Dan Coughlin with his new book, “Crazy, with the papers to prove it.”,  Regina Brett from the Plain Dealer and WKSU-FM, with her new book, “God Never Blinks”.  One of the more provocative titles offered at the show is “Holy Shit: Managing Manure To Save Mankind.” by well-known author Gene Logsdon.  Rick Porrello, a former police officer, has a new book, “To Kill the Irishman:The War that crippled the Mafia”.  You can see a full listing of the authors and the books available at the show’s website: http://www.buckeyebookfair.com

The show opens at 9:30 AM and runs until 4PM.  There is an admission charge to the auditorium.

I will also be giving a talk at the Solon Branch of the Cuyahoga County Public Library at 7PM on Thursday, November 4th.  Call the library to register to attend the talk.

Check out your Ohio roots

“Who do you think you are?”, a popular NBC- TV show this past year, traced the family history of several celebrities, including Ohio native Sarah Jessica Parker.  The show touched off new interest in genealogy and coincidentally it comes at a time that the Ohio Genealogical Society has just opened their brand new, state-of-the-art, library […]

“Who do you think you are?”, a popular NBC- TV show this past year, traced the family history of several celebrities, including Ohio native Sarah Jessica Parker.  The show touched off new interest in genealogy and coincidentally it comes at a time that the Ohio Genealogical Society has just opened their brand new, state-of-the-art, library and headquarters near Bellville, Ohio in Richland County.

The 19-thousand square foot family history research library cost 2.5 million dollars  and is named for Samuel D. Isaly who grew up in Richland County and founded the Isaly Dairy Company and invented the Klondike Ice Cream Bar.  His generous donation to the society made the library construction possible.

Sunda Anderson Peters, President of the OGS gave me a tour of the new modern research facility and pointed out that anyone, but especially those with Ohio roots, that wants to discover their family history should make their first stop at the new library just south of Mansfield.

“Bring as much information about your family as you have.”, She said,  ” We have wonderful volunteers here who are very experienced in genealogical research and they are happy to guide you and show you how to start your search.”

The new library contains extensive death and birth records from all over Ohio  as well as census records and many other original research tools in their archives.

There is a $4.00 daily charge to use the library which is open Tuesday-Saturday.   Closed Sunday and Mondays.

…..Read the rest of this story in the October 23rd edition of the Plain Dealer or at their website at http://www.cleveland.com

Take A Safari In Ohio

The Wilds, one of Ohio’s fastest growing animal attractions is certainly the largest such attraction in the Buckeye State.  Covering a staggering 14-square miles near Cambridge in the southeast quadrant of the state. The hundreds of exotic animals that roam these ten-thousand acres of hills, lakes and wooded flatlands represent at least 25 different types […]

The Wilds, one of Ohio’s fastest growing animal attractions is certainly the largest such attraction in the Buckeye State.  Covering a staggering 14-square miles near Cambridge in the southeast quadrant of the state.

The hundreds of exotic animals that roam these ten-thousand acres of hills, lakes and wooded flatlands represent at least 25 different types of endangered species who are being carefully cared for to ensure the breed survives.  Everything from giraffes to giant white rhinos.  In recent years they had added cheetahs and wild dogs in a separate enclosure.

The Wilds, while being an educational and conservation site has become a major Ohio tourist attraction and a ride on a safari vehicle through the site is just about as close as you can get to the safari experience without being in Africa or some other remote country.  Here you see the animals in their own habitat not in small enclosures or cages.  Here the animals roam free while visitors are kept inside a cage-like bus, which are air-conditioned and also heated for winter-time tours.

Time is running out for the regular Safari Tours that are only offered on weekends in October.   There will be some winter-time special, reservation only, trips scheduled during the winter months of November to early spring.

The Wilds is located at 14000 International Road, Cumberland, Ohio.  Phone 740-638-5030 or you can visit them at their website at http://www.thewilds.org

A Busy Week On The Book Tour

 This is going to be a busy week on the book tour.  Monday, October 4th we head for Wooster, Ohio and a speech at the Wooster Library at 7 PM.  Then Tuesday The Parma Library had so many people register for an appearance I was to make there that they have scheduled me to do […]

"A Memoir for anyone who wants to peer into the soul of Ohio."…Midwest Book Review, Oregon, Wisconsin

 This is going to be a busy week on the book tour.  Monday, October 4th we head for Wooster, Ohio and a speech at the Wooster Library at 7 PM.  Then Tuesday The Parma Library had so many people register for an appearance I was to make there that they have scheduled me to do TWO speeches on different days to accomodate the crowd.  The first will be Tuesday, October 5 at 2PM at the main library at 7335 Ridge Road.  Then, two days later, on Thursday, October 7th we go back to the same place in Parma to give a second speech this time at 7 PM in the evening.  I hope to meet some of you at one of these stops.